Datuk Gong

Melaka

This post is by no means a definitive guide to the deities known collectively as Datuk Gong, but rather simply a general overview of their worship.

While I have a great interest in these deities, I know very little about them. What I do know has been acquired through reading online articles, Wikipedia entries and some academic texts; and also from conversations with various people, including those who revere the deities, but, unfortunately, do not have in-depth knowledge of them.

What follows is my impression and personal interpretation of what I have read and heard about Datuk Gong. Continue reading “Datuk Gong”

Fa Zhu Gong

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Statues of this deity have long fascinated me because of their appearance. Many I know would cringe at Fa Zhu Gong’s coal-black face, bulbous forehead, and his bulging eyes, but there must be a reason for them.

I have yet to find any recorded research that touches on Fa Zhu Gong’s appearance, but one online seller of a statue of the deity attributes his black skin to a fight he had with a fireball-wielding demon.

In any case, when he was a mortal, Fa Zhu Gong was said to be a helpful individual who never hesitated to assist those in need. He healed the sick and defended the weak, and was eventually venerated for his good deeds.

The cobra that is often depicted coiled around his arm was a beast he subdued and made his pet. The deity was able to transform the snake into a whip, which he used to fight evil, particularly when treating the victims of demonic possession. Continue reading “Fa Zhu Gong”

Mazu

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Mazu (媽祖) is a Chinese sea goddess. Some say she was a tenth century shaman called Lin Moniang () who was deified as the protector of seafarers. Myths and legends ascribe various heroic deeds to her, all to do with the sea.

So popular a goddess is she that Mazu is regarded as the Queen of Heaven (天后, Tianhou), the wife of the Jade Emperor. She is also known as Heavenly Consort (天妃); and Holy Heavenly Mother (天上聖母, Tianhou Shengmu). However, some legends say that she is celibate.

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Mazu, flanked by Qianliyan [left] and Shunfeng’er [right].
One story tells that the demons Qianliyan and Shunfeng’er competed for Mazu’s hand in marriage, but when she defeated them both in combat, they swore eternal loyalty to her and became her guardians. Thus, you can find their statues or images at Mazu temples.

 

 

 

The Jade Emperor

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The Jade Emperor (玉皇) is the chief of the Daoist gods. His names include Heavenly Grandfather (天公Tiān Gōng) and the Great Emperor of Jade (玉皇上帝Yu Huang Shangdi or 玉皇大帝Yu Huang Dadi).

The Jade Emperor is said to have inherited his post from the first of the Three Pure Ones, the Jade Pure One (Yuqing 玉清), also known as The Celestial Worthy of the Primordial Beginning (Yuanshi Tianzun 元始天尊). In time, the Heaven-honoured One of the Dawn of Jade of the Golden Gate (金闕玉晨天尊) will replace Yuanshi Tianzun.

The Jade Emperor lives in his palace in heaven with his wife the Jade Empress, Tianshang Shengmu (天上聖母, Holy Heavenly Mother), who is often conflated with Mazu (媽祖), and their large family. Continue reading “The Jade Emperor”

Queen Mother of the West

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In her earliest incarnation, in pre-Daoism fifteenth century BCE, she was depicted with tiger’s teeth and panther’s tail. As the Daoist goddess Xi Wangmu (西王母), or Queen Mother of the West, she was made feminine and beautiful, but is still sometimes depicted riding a tiger or in the company of tigers.

By second century BCE she was known to be the dispenser of prosperity, longevity, and eternal bliss.

In the garden of her palace in the mythological Mount Kunlun,  the Queen Mother of the West grew immortality peaches which ripened every three thousand years.

Some tales name her as the creator of the Daode jing (道德經). She is said to have then shared the text with Laozi (老子). Naturally, there are tales that have the Queen Mother playing second fiddle to the old man. Whatever the case may be, she is said to embody the Daoist female principle of yin and is extensively referred to in Tang Dynasty poetry about Daoist women.

Unlike the Western meaning of Queen Mother (the mother of a monarch), Xi Wangmu’s title means that she is both a Queen and a Mother.

 

 

Star Mother

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Dǒumǔ (斗母) is the mother of the Big Dipper, who are of course seven of the nine stars that make up the Nine Emperor Gods. Her other names include Dǒumǔ Yuánjūn (斗母元君) or Lady Mother of the Chariot; Tàiyī Yuánjūn (太一元君) or Lady of the Great One; Tiānhòu (天后) or Queen of Heaven; Dàomǔ (道母) or Mother of the Way; and Tiānmǔ (天母) or Mother of Heaven.

As the Nine Emperor Gods are seen as nine-fold manifestations of Dòufù (斗父 ) or Father of the Great Chariot, the God of Heaven, Dǒumǔ is both wife and mother of the God of Heaven. She is also identified as the ambiguous goddess of life and death Xi Wangmu, or the Queen Mother of the West.

 

Nine Gods

The Nine Emperor Gods are the sons of Father Emperor Zhou Yu Dou Fu Yuan Jun (斗父周御國王天尊) and the North Star Dou Mu Yuan Jun (斗母元君).

They are the seven (visible) stars that make up the Big Dipper, plus another two (invisible) ‘assistant’ stars.

The Nine Emperor Gods are often wrongly conflated with folk heroes like the sea pirates of the Ming dynasty who plotted to overthrow the Qing dynasty. They are actually high ranking Star Lords who preside over the movement of planets and coordinate mortal Life and Death issues.

Their parents, Dou Fu and Dou Mu, hold the Registrar of Life and Death.

The festival for the Emperor Gods lasts nine days, from the eve of the ninth lunar month.